Category Archives: Testosterone Information

Testosterone Information Articles


Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»

Clinical Practice Guideline


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

Details Published on Sunday, 14 December 2014 05:00 Written by DrSue.ca There is a lot of conflicting information out there for women who seek answers about testosterone. To answer many important questions around this issue, the Endocrine Society has recently released an updated Clinical Practice Guideline about testosterone treatment in women. Key points in these guidelines: 1. They recommend against diagnosing 'testosterone deficiency' in women. Reason: The data out there is unclear as to whether low testosterone levels correlate with symptoms or not. Also, it is normal for testosterone levels to decrease with reproductive aging. 2. They recommend against treatment of women with testosterone. The only exception to this is postmenopausal women who have been formally diagnosed with Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD). They specifically recommend against treating with testosterone for reason of: infertility; cognitive, cardiovascular, metabolic, or bone health; sexual dysfunction (other than HSDD); or general well being. Reason: It has not been proven that testosterone treatment is of clear benefit for uses other than in HSDD; government approved and monitored preparations of testosterone for women are not readily available; and, there is not evidence to prove long term safety of testosterone treatment. Further, there is a concern that … Read more »

TestoFuel testosterone booster testimonial review Anthony – Video


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Published on December 14th, 2014

TestoFuel testosterone booster testimonial review Anthony Anthony from Wales, UK shares his experience of using TestoFuel. By: Roar Ambition Read the original here: TestoFuel testosterone booster testimonial review Anthony - Video … Read more »

Your Testosterone May Contribute to Colon Cancer Tumor Growth


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

Columbia, MO - infoZine - Previous cancer research has revealed that women are less likely than men to suffer from non-sex specific cancers such as cancer of the colon, pancreas and stomach. Scientists theorized that perhaps this trend was due to a protecting effect created by female hormones, such as estrogen, that help prevent tumors from forming. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found evidence suggesting that the male hormone testosterone may actually be a contributing factor in the formation of colon cancer tumors. In his study, James Amos-Landgraf, an assistant professor of veterinary pathobiology in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, observed normal levels of naturally occurring colon cancer in a group of male rats. He then removed testosterone from those rats and colon cancer rates decreased dramatically. After reintroducing testosterone, the colon cancer rates returned to normal. Previously, scientists believed that female hormones may have lent some sort of protection against tumor susceptibility, Amos-Landgraf said. However, by showing that removing testosterone from rats leads to a drastic decrease in colon cancer susceptibility, it appears that male hormones may actually contribute to colon tumor growth rather than female hormones being protective. Amos-Landgraf also points to higher rates … Read more »

What alcohol does to you testosterone level part 1 – Video


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Published on December 10th, 2014

What alcohol does to you testosterone level part 1 Drinking to much to the wrong song yields obvious results. By: zeddyzedful Link: What alcohol does to you testosterone level part 1 - Video … Read more »

Testosterone in men


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

The counterpart to the female menopause is called andropause (or the "male menopause"). Testosterone levels in men begin to decline with aging, beginning in the early 30s, and by age 40, levels naturally decline by one percent per year. However, the decline in male hormone production is much more gradual than the decline in female hormone production. Testosterone performs many roles, some of which are: protecting the cardiovascular system by widening the lumen of the coronary arteries, increasing blood supply to the heart, reducing serum cholesterol and minimizing atherosclerosis, reducing high blood pressure by vasodilatation, increasing fibrinolytic activity of the blood, giving the capacity to oppose blood clot formation and dissolve blood clots. Testosterone protects against obesity and diabetes by increasing the efficacy of insulin to make glucose penetrate into the brain, the muscles, the heart and other lean tissue targets. It supports the brain and nerves by increasing blood supply and the number of connections between neurons. Bone strength and density are sustained, as well as muscle mass and strength. Testosterone improves mood and memory, reduces anxiety, and maintains sexual function. Low levels of testosterone can result from diabetes, liver disease, hemochromatosis, obesity, smoking, chronic alcohol use, and medications … Read more »

Testosterone may contribute to colon cancer tumor growth


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

Previous cancer research has revealed that women are less likely than men to suffer from non-sex specific cancers such as cancer of the colon, pancreas and stomach. Scientists theorized that perhaps this trend was due to a protecting effect created by female hormones, such as estrogen, that help prevent tumors from forming. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found evidence suggesting that the male hormone testosterone may actually be a contributing factor in the formation of colon cancer tumors. In his study, James Amos-Landgraf, an assistant professor of veterinary pathobiology in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, observed normal levels of naturally occurring colon cancer in a group of male rats. He then removed testosterone from those rats and colon cancer rates decreased dramatically. After reintroducing testosterone, the colon cancer rates returned to normal. "Previously, scientists believed that female hormones may have lent some sort of protection against tumor susceptibility," Amos-Landgraf said. "However, by showing that removing testosterone from rats leads to a drastic decrease in colon cancer susceptibility, it appears that male hormones may actually contribute to colon tumor growth rather than female hormones being protective." Amos-Landgraf also points to higher rates of colon cancer in post-menopausal … Read more »

Will testosterone make women happier?


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

Balance restored: Jane Fonda has touted the benefits of taking testosterone later in life. Jane Fonda gave a candid interview three years ago in which she admitted that her sex life needed some artificial help and she had been taking testosterone to boost it, from the age of 70. She attributed her youthful looks and happy demeanour to a healthy love life. "If you want to remain sexual and your libido has dropped, taking a small dose of the libido-boosting hormone testosterone makes a huge difference," she said. Several studies have shown the importance of maintaining healthy testosterone levels in males and doctors have started to recognise the benefits of testosterone therapy for aging men and also for younger men who have testosterone-deficiency. But evidence that women can also become testosterone-deficient is largely ignored. Only levels of the "female" hormones progesterone and oestrogen were thought to be important for a woman's health and wellbeing. But many experts now believe that it's the loss of testosterone, not oestrogen, that causes women in midlife to gain weight, feel fatigue and lose mental focus, bone density and muscle tone. Advertisement Many women reaching menopause are scared off by the belief that hormone replacement … Read more »

Mojo Webinar Replay: Avoid The Estrogen Epidemic And Raise Testosterone Naturally – Video


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

Mojo Webinar Replay: Avoid The Estrogen Epidemic And Raise Testosterone Naturally The full title of this webinar was: "The Estrogen Epidemic: How The Foods You are Eating Are Secretly Making You A Feminized Man". How To Increase Testosterone Naturally! More testosterone... By: Neil Cannon See more here: Mojo Webinar Replay: Avoid The Estrogen Epidemic And Raise Testosterone Naturally - Video … Read more »

Testosterone in women: How important is it?


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

Testosterone is another important hormone necessary for your personal hormonal symphony. Testosterone loss can occur at anytime in a woman's life. Deficiencies can begin with menopause but can also occur after childbirth. Hormone levels are often 'reset' after childbirth, however, not always correctly. Other factors that can lower testosterone levels include: chemotherapy, adrenal stress and burnout, endometriosis, depression, birth control pills, psychological trauma, and statin drugs. Deficiencies occur earlier and initially at a greater rate in women than in men. High amounts of testosterone are consumed, thereby depleting androgen levels, with intense physical activity such as long distance running as well as other vigorous sports. An optimal level of testosterone improves mood and assertiveness, reduces depression and anxiety, improves bone density, muscle size and strength, and enhances libido. It helps maintain memory; however, in a woman, effective levels of estrogen must also be present. It helps stop the skin from sagging, and decreases excess body fat. Symptoms of low testosterone include: muscle wasting, weight gain, fatigue, low self-esteem, decreased HDL cholesterol levels, dry and thin skin with poor elasticity, thinning and dry hair, droopy eyelids, sagging cheeks, thin lips and anxiety. Based on known effects of androgens, it is likely … Read more »

Side Effects Associated with Low T Prescription Drugs


Posted by Dr. Michael White, Updated on October 25th, 2018

Many men that suffer from low testosterone (also known as Low T) are taking hormone replacement therapy drugs that are linked to serious health concerns including heart attack and stroke. Several studies associate certain testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) drugs to an increased risk of cardiovascular problems such as heart attack, stroke, or deep vein thrombosis. Advocacy groups have called for updated black-box warnings to be included on all testosterone packages. These groups have also petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to require Low T drug manufacturers to include warnings on the labels currently on the market. Testosterone Therapy and Use of Low T Drugs An estimated 3 to 7 percent of men in the U.S. have hypogonadism (low testosterone) a condition in which the body fails to produce enough hormones due to issues with the pituitary gland or testicles. However, with the advent of several Low T drugs on the market such as AndroGel, Androderm, Axiron, Delatestryl, Fortesta, Striant, Testim, Testopel among others thepercentage of men 40 and older being treated for Low T has more than tripled from 2001 to 2011, according to a USA Today article. The problem is that testosterone levels vary widely and is … Read more »


Page 20«..10..19202122..3040..»