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Tom Verducci: New testing protocols may have caught A-Rod, could change game

Alex Rodriguez has been banned for the entire 2014 season because of his alleged use of PEDs.

Patrick/AP

The 60 Minutes report Sunday night in which Tony Bosch detailed how he helped Alex Rodriguez beat baseball’s drug testing program missed an important distinction about how Rodriguez got away with popping testosterone-laced gummies before a game: Rodriguez’s drug regimen from 2010-12 is an outdated strategy that likely would not have worked last year when baseball tightened its testing protocols.

Baseball owners and players agreed in 2013 to adopt the so-called “biological passport” form of testing — the same testing that disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong admitted forced him to abruptly end his years of doping.

“Biological passport testing is a game changer,” said Dr. Gary Wadler, past chairman of the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Prohibited List.

From 2010-12 Bosch and Rodriguez were playing a covert game that became common as players moved from hard-core steroids to fine-tuned drug protocols designed to evade tests. Before 2013, baseball used the testosterone-to-epitestosterone ratio as the baseline for defining a flagged test. The sport allowed a T:E ratio of up to 4:1. Only if the T:E ratio exceeded 4:1 would baseball’s lab subject a sample to Carbon Isotope Radio Mass Spectrometry, known as IRMS, a more sophisticated test that will find the synthetic testosterone that normal urine tests miss.

“The key to what Bosch was doing was taking a baseline T:E ratio and administering testosterone in a way that the ratio would be under 4:1,” said a source familiar with Bosch’s protocol.

Bosch’s method is typically known in the business of cheating as “microdosing.” It involved precisely timed doses of fast-acting testosterone in conjunction with other drugs that helped manage the T:E rate, especially human growth hormone. According to Wadler, research in Australia showed that taking HGH in conjunction with testosterone can help lower a T:E rate that otherwise would be higher without HGH. (Baseball did not begin testing for HGH until 2013.)

Though Bosch’s method generally worked as far as evading detection in tests, it required precision in timing and dosages. Bosch told 60 Minutes that taking one of his PEDs just 15 minutes later than prescribed by him could lead to a positive drug test. His method did trip up clients such as Ryan Braun, Melky Cabrera, Yasmani Grandal and Bartolo Colon, all of who tested positive in 2011 or 2012 for elevated levels of testosterone. (Braun’s positive test was overturned upon an appeal that challenged how the sample was handled.) Braun’s sample, taken after Game 1 of the 2011 National League Division Series, produced a T:E ratio that was reported to be more than 20:1.

“Braun got caught because he used either too much or too late,” said another source familiar with the case. Others have speculated that Braun wrongly dismissed the possibility of being subject to testing in postseason play and disregarded Bosch’s microdosing protocol.

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Tom Verducci: New testing protocols may have caught A-Rod, could change game

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Testosterone Gummies, ‘Rocket’ Cream: A-Rod’s Alleged Doping Secrets

Jan 13, 2014 12:07pm

In an explosive interview, the self-described nutritionist who says he supplied New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez with performance enhancing drugs, detailed the secret regimen he claims to the ball player employed sometimes while on the field.

Rodriguez denies the allegations by Anthony Bosch, and his lawyer is filing a federal lawsuit today against Major League Baseball in an effort to overturn a 162-game suspension levied by an independent arbitrator.

Bosch told 60 Minutes that Rodriguez took numerous performance enhancing drugs, sometimes just minutes before a game or while in the field.

In the interview Bosch alleges:

The allegations are reminiscent of those leveled against other big-name athletes who were caught doping.

All-Star outfielder Barry Bonds was convicted in 2011 of obstructing a federal investigation into BALCO, a company found supplying PEDs to pro baseball players. In leaked grand jury testimony, Bonds allegedly admitted to using the cream and the clear, two kinds of PED.

Six-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong, who for years denied using PEDs, even after most of the members of his cycling team confessed, finally admitted to doping last year. Armstrong confessed to using the banned substance EPO, taking testosterone and even undergoing blood transfusions between 1999 and 2005.

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Testosterone Gummies, ‘Rocket’ Cream: A-Rod’s Alleged Doping Secrets

Lance Armstrong Before



Lance Armstrong Before After Steroids EPO HGH etc
Lance Armstrong Before After Steroids EPO HGH etc. Reality is if anyone has their eyes half open and been paying attention in the last 30 years that 100% of our big name champs earing big $ are juiced to the gills. Sorry mate but the Nike advert saying 'its all about hard work' is only telling half the story. It should be 'Its all about hard work and hardcore doping products!!' or 'EPO, HGH, Testosterone, CERA Blood Doping – JUST DO IT!” Do you honestly think that Michael Jordan, Lebron, Kobe etc are clean but Barry Bonds was a cheat? The greats of baseball are cheats but the greats of basketball are clean? Reality is you need FAR more fitness in basketball than baseball. FAR more fitness. Doping products don't help basketballers Jordan fanboyz constantly tell me though. Only cyclists dope right? GIMME A BREAK!! LMFAO! FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 USC section 106A-117 of the US Copyright Law. Bigger Stronger Faster is a great doco to watch if you want to scratch the surface. www.biggerstrongerfastermovie…. Congrats to the producers of this doco.

By: duriansrider

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Lance Armstrong Before

Substance of interest: Testosterone

TrueHoop has been investigating PEDs and the NBA all season. The next in a series:

Thanks to Lance Armstrong, Bill Simmons and others, NBA fans are thinking about performance-enhancing drugs in new ways.

And if the comments on ESPN.com or Twitter are any judge, the drug they’re most concerned with is human growth hormone. When superhuman athletic performance is the topic, this seemingly magical new substance that they don’t even test for in the NBA generally stars in the conversation.

But talk to people with deep first-hand knowledge of doping and HGH takes a back seat to testosterone.

It’s a widely available substance that dopers from other sports put at the forefront of their regimens. It’s all over baseball’s Mitchell Report, the thoughts of Victor Conte (mastermind of the BALCO scandal that engulfed baseball and track) and cycling’s various scandals.

And testosterone has several built-in advantages to the would-be NBA drug cheat.

The implications are big, and yet it’s so easy to use.

It is sort of the lollipop of drug cheating, says Daniel Coyle, who co-wrote The Secret Race with cyclist Tyler Hamilton. That’s the book that blew the doors open on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal, because not only did Hamilton cheat right along with his teammate Armstrong, but he also reformed himself and resolved to tell every little detail of how it happened.

To recover better between contests

“The Secret Race” has an important story about the first time Hamilton, who did not want to cheat, took banned drugs. At that stage of his career, Hamilton was fast enough to be a good pro cyclist on many days. But he simply couldn’t recover fast enough between races.

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Substance of interest: Testosterone

Micro-dopes: AFL's testosterone fears

Exclusive

FEARS have been raised among players that the practice of micro-doping common in sports such as cycling and athletics might have been practised by rogue individuals in the AFL.

Concerns have been expressed to the AFL Players Association that a small number of players might have been taking tiny, undetectable amounts of performance-enhancing substances such as testosterone and human growth hormone, or its equivalents.

The AFLPA has been made aware that players might have used arm patches similar to nicotine patches that contain testosterone, or have used creams with properties similar to HGH.

These concerns, while not widespread, have also been aired at club level. The concerns raised are that these practices, although far from routine and certainly underground, are suspected to have been used by rogue players across different clubs.

Concerns about possible micro-doping have been raised after the investigation into whether Essendon took performance-enhancing drugs, though these fears are not pointing directly to the Bombers, who have taken the dramatic step of announcing a review of governance and processes at the club, to be carried out by former Telstra boss Ziggy Switkowski.

Former Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority chief executive Richard Ings said micro-doping was the method of cheating used by Lance Armstrong and Marion Jones, and usually involved using a cocktail of very small, undetectable amounts of different substances such as HGH, testosterone and EPO.

Ings said the advantage of micro-doping was that the amounts were small enough to avoid detection, but that by using different substances in concert, including with transdermal patches, the overall effect on the athlete was significant.

But while the player-generated concerns centre on HGH-like substances or peptides and testosterone, there has never been any suggestion that EPO, which boosts the production of red blood cells and was rife in cycling, has been abused by AFL players. I dont know if [micro-dopings] gone on in the AFL, but I do know that its common [in sport], Ings said.

Micro-doping was the most common way athletes use banned substances, he said.

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Micro-dopes: AFL's testosterone fears

AFL's testosterone fears

Exclusive

FEARS have been raised among players that the practice of micro-doping common in sports such as cycling and athletics might have been practised by rogue individuals in the AFL.

Concerns have been expressed to the AFL Players Association that a small number of players might have been taking tiny, undetectable amounts of performance-enhancing substances such as testosterone and human growth hormone, or its equivalents.

The AFLPA has been made aware that players might have used arm patches similar to nicotine patches that contain testosterone, or have used creams with properties similar to HGH.

These concerns, while not widespread, have also been aired at club level. The concerns raised are that these practices, although far from routine and certainly underground, are suspected to have been used by rogue players across different clubs.

Concerns about possible micro-doping have been raised after the investigation into whether Essendon took performance-enhancing drugs, though these fears are not pointing directly to the Bombers, who have taken the dramatic step of announcing a review of governance and processes at the club, to be carried out by former Telstra boss Ziggy Switkowski.

Former Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority chief executive Richard Ings said micro-doping was the method of cheating used by Lance Armstrong and Marion Jones, and usually involved using a cocktail of very small, undetectable amounts of different substances such as HGH, testosterone and EPO.

Ings said the advantage of micro-doping was that the amounts were small enough to avoid detection, but that by using different substances in concert, including with transdermal patches, the overall effect on the athlete was significant.

But while the player-generated concerns centre on HGH-like substances or peptides and testosterone, there has never been any suggestion that EPO, which boosts the production of red blood cells and was rife in cycling, has been abused by AFL players. I dont know if [micro-dopings] gone on in the AFL, but I do know that its common [in sport], Ings said.

Micro-doping was the most common way athletes use banned substances, he said.

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AFL's testosterone fears

Banned substances Armstrong used to win

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

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Banned substances Armstrong used to win

Armstrong admits to using EPO, cortisone, testosterone

(CNN) –

Lance Armstrong admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that aired Thursday night.

Did he use EPO? Testosterone? Cortisone? Human growth hormone? Illegal blood transfusions and other blood doping? Armstrong answered “yes” on all counts.

In October, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency released more than 1,000 pages of evidence in doping allegations against Armstrong and his teammates. He was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles in the scandal. On Thursday, the International Olympic Committee demanded that he give back the bronze medal he won in 2000.

The charges against Armstrong are all too common in the cycling world. Cyclist Floyd Landis was stripped of his 2006 Tour de France title after failing a drug test. Eighty percent of the Tour de France medalists between 1996 and 2010 have been “similarly tainted by doping,” according to the USADA report on Armstrong.

A look at the drugs Armstrong used:

Blood doping

EPO, or erythropoietin, is a hormone naturally produced by human kidneys to stimulate red blood cell production, according to the World Anti-Doping Agency. Cyclists and other athletes use EPO to raise their red blood cell counts, which increases the amount of oxygen that can be delivered to muscles, improving recovery and endurance.

Although EPO has been banned since the 1990s, the first screening test was used at the 2000 Summer Olympic Games in Sydney.

Blood transfusions have a similar effect on the body’s red blood cell count. Usually an athlete will store some of his blood when his hemoglobin levels are high, then reinfuse it right before an event. This type of transfusion cannot be detected by current tests, according to the USADA.

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Armstrong admits to using EPO, cortisone, testosterone

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Lance Armstrong's alleged drugs

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Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

Lance Armstrong over the years

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Lance Armstrong's alleged drugs

Cycling-Former team mates testimony about Armstrong

Oct 10 (Reuters) – What former team mates of Lance Armstrong told the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency during their investigation into doping in cycling.

FRANKIE ANDREAU

Armstrong team mate for parts of nine seasons (1992-1996, 1998-2002). Retired from cycling in 2000. Admitted doping. Said he over overheard Armstrong in 1996 acknowledge use of EPO, testosterone, human growth hormone, steroids and cortisone.

MICHAEL BARRY

Armstrong team mate for four seasons (2002 – 2005). Said U.S. Postal team doctors and staff gave him banned drugs.

TOM DANIELSON

A team mate of Armstrong for one season (2005). Admitted doping. Said team supplied him with drugs, including EPO.

TYLER HAMILTON

Armstrong team mate for four seasons (1998-2001) and winner of 2004 Olympic gold medal of which he was later stripped. Admitted doping. Said he saw Armstrong take EPO and testosterone during 1999 Tour de France and testosterone in 2000. Said he received blood transfusions with Armstrong during 2000 Tour de France and Armstrong gave him EPO in 1999 and 2001.

GEORGE HINCAPIE

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Cycling-Former team mates testimony about Armstrong